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The Charger Bulletin

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | May 4, 2011

Word of the Week: Incredulous [in•cred•u•lous] adj. 

1. Skeptical; disbelieving: incredulous of stories about flying saucers.  2. Expressive of disbelief: an incredulous stare.

 

Fact of the week: Odontophobia is the fear of teeth.

 

Did they seriously just say that?

“It’s not that I dislike many people. It’s just that I don’t like many people.”

 -Bryant Gumbel

 

Weekly Thought:

When you make a mistake, don’t look back at it long. Take the reason of the thing into your mind and then look forward. Mistakes are lessons of wisdom. The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power.

-Hugh White (1773 – 1840)

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | April 27, 2011

meed (meed) n. a fitting return or recompense. [from Old English med.]

Fact of the week: Babies are born with 300 bones, but by adulthood we have only 206 in our Bodies.


Did they seriously just say that?

“China is a big country, inhabited by many Chinese.”


- Charles de Gaulle

Weekly Thought:

“A man’s growth is seen in the successive choirs of his friends.”

- Ralph Waldo Emerson

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | April 20, 2011

putative (pyoot’-uh-tive) adj. 1: commonly accepted or supposed. 2: assumed to exist or to have existed.

[From Middle English from Late Latin putativus from Latin putatus, from past participle of putare “to think.”]

 

Fact of the week: Every human spent about half an hour as a single cell.

Did they seriously just say that?

“If it weren’t for electricity, we’d all be watching television by candlelight.”

- George Gobel, actor and comedian

 

Weekly Thought:

The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.

- Eleanor Roosevelt

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | April 13, 2011

 

tumid (too’-mid) adj. 1: marked by swelling, swollen, enlarged. 2: protuberant, bulging.

3: bombastic, turgid. [from Latin tumidus, from tumere “to swell.”]

 

Fact of the week: The word “nerd” was first coined by Dr. Seuss in If I Ran the Zoo.

Did they seriously just say that? “Better make it six, I can’t eat eight.”

- Dan Osinski, Baseball pitcher, when a waitress asked whether he wanted his pizza cut into six or eight slices.

 

Weekly Thought: “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

-Theodore Roosevelt

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | April 6, 2011

skepsis (skep’-sis) n. philosophic doubt as to the objective reality of phenomena; (broadly) a skeptical outlook or attitude.

[from Greek skepsis “examination, doubt, skeptical philosophy.”]

Fact of the week: The first person selected as the Time Magazine Man of the Year – Charles Lindbergh in 1927.

Did they seriously just say that? “Fiction writing is great; you can make up almost anything.”


-Ivana Trump, on finishing her first novel

Weekly Thought: Be nice to people on your way up because you’ll need them on your way down.

-Wilson Mizner

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | March 30, 2011

Word of the Week: pule (pyool) v.i. to whine or whimper.

Fact of the week: Rhode Island is the smallest state with the longest name. The official name, used on all state documents, is “Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.”

Did they seriously just say that? “I’ve been noticing gravity since I was very young.” -Cameron Diaz

Weekly Thought: You’ve got a lot of choices.  If getting out of bed in the morning is a chore and you’re not smiling on a regular basis, try another choice.  -Steven D. Woodhull

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | March 23, 2011

Word of the week: fug (fugg) n. an odorous emanation, especially, the stuffy atmosphere of a poorly ventilated space.

adj. fuggy. v.i. to loll indoors in a stuffy atmosphere. v.t. to make fuggy.

 

Fact of the week: There are twice as many kangaroos in Australia as there are people.

The kangaroo population is estimated at about 40 million.

 

Did they seriously just say that? “Wal-Mart… do they like make walls there?”

–Paris Hilton

 

Weekly Thought:

The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra. 

–Jimmy Johnson

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | March 2, 2011

kerf (kerf) n. 1: a slit or notch made by a saw or cutting torch. 2: the width of cut made by a saw or cutting torch.

[from Old English cyrf “the action of cutting,” akin to Old English ceorfan “to carve”.]

Fact of the week: There are 10 human body parts that are only three letters long

(eye, hip, arm, leg, ear, toe, jaw, rib, lip, and gum).

Did they seriously just say that? “Is an egg a vegetable?”

–Jodie Marsh

Weekly Thought: Time you enjoy wasting, was not wasted. 

- John Lennon

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | February 23, 2011

tyro (tie’-roh) n. a beginner in learning, a novice. [from Latin tiro “young soldier, tyro”.]

Fact of the week: A lion’s roar can be heard from five miles away.

Did they seriously just say that? “In the studio, I do try to have a thought in my head, so that it’s not like a blank stare.”

-Cindi Crawford on modeling

Weekly Thought: Don’t get your knickers in a knot.  Nothing is solved and it just makes you walk funny. 

-Kathryn Carpenter

Courtney’s Weekly Words

by Courtney Faber | February 16, 2011

yestreen (yes-treen’) n. (chiefly Scottish) last evening or last night.

Fact of the week: Karoke means “empty orchestra” in Japanese.

Did they seriously just say that? “A proof is a proof. What kind of proof? It’s a proof. A proof is proof. And when you have a good proof, it’s because it is proven.”

- Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien

Weekly Thought: Never make your home in a place.  Make a home for yourself inside your own head.  You’ll find what you need to furnish it – memory, friends you can trust, love of learning, and other such things.  That way it will go with you wherever you journey.  -Tad Williams

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