Monday, March 30, 2015  
The Charger Bulletin

The Final Debate

by Miriam Correia | March 30, 2015

The last debate of the USGA Elections was Tuesday, March 24 in the Bartels Programming Space.  USGA Presidential Candidates Kayla Wallace, Colin Weber and James Kielar were all present and Treasurer Candidate, Annalisa Berardinelli was out of town, so she was video-conferenced in.  Current USGA President Richard Rotella hosted the debate.  There was ice cream for the attendees and the friendliness between the candidates gave the event a very fun, low-key vibe.

It was a friendly debate; all of the candidates gave each other time to talk and there were no rebuttals.  It was more of a “get to know the candidates,” event than a debate.  President Rotella started the event by taking questions for the audience.

Some of the questions asked included: Given all campus involvement, where would the USGA Position fall on list of priorities? What do you think is the best part of UNH? The worst? What will you look for in other E-Board members to make a good team?  What do you believe are the best qualities in a leader? The worst? And what is one thing you would improve about UNH?

When asked about qualities in E-Board members, Kielar said he is looking for the ability to work well with others, passionate about UNH and USGA and good reputations, clarifying that it is not a popularity contest but he doesn’t want someone who has burnt bridges along their way at UNH.

Wallace was asked about having non-Greek life students on USGA and she is very open to it.  In fact, she looks forward to reaching out to non-Greek life students if she does win.  She wants USGA to be as diverse and well-rounded as the UNH population is.

All of the candidates gave very thoughtful answers; they all have a lot of pride in UNH and see potential where it seems to be lacking.  Big themes for the night were reaching out to veterans for more involvement and representation, having more non-Greek life students on USGA, finding out why people are transferring and doing something to change it and making sure students know what to do to channel their complaints and make sure they are heard.

When asked where USGA position would fall on list of involvement, Berardinelli said that it would take the top spot.  She stated that she would be willing to lessen involvement in other areas if need be to make sure she is doing a good job as USGA Treasurer.

After the audience asked questions, President Rotella asked a few of his own.  He asked questions along the lines of what direction the candidates would like to see USGA go in next year, how the presidential candidates would go about unifying the student body and USGA, and what the candidates’ favorite tradition is on campus and how they would go about creating new ones.  The candidates continued to give earnest, passionate answers to each question.

“To bring a more open environment for the students coming next year,” Weber said when asked about the direction of USGA if he is elected President.

Some of the responses for the best parts of UNH were the opportunities for experiential education, the professors, the diversity and the unique experiences that this campus has to offer.

It’s evident that all of the candidates are proud to be UNH students.  Although their answers were not exactly the same for every question, they are all passionate about what UNH has to offer and want to make sure every other student here knows about all the good things on campus.

The Spring 2015 USGA Candidates

by The Charger Bulletin | March 25, 2015

LAU’s Deal or No Deal

by Alyssa MacKinnon | March 25, 2015

The German club was packed Wednesday, March 11 as students lined up for Lambda Alpha Upsilon’s annual Deal or No Deal event.

LAU brothers and the ladies who volunteered to help (Photo by Alyssa MacKinnon/Charger Bulletin photo)

LAU brothers and the ladies who volunteered to help (Photo by Alyssa MacKinnon/Charger Bulletin photo)

The seventh year of the Deal or No Deal event featured DJ Prestige and live tweeting with the hashtag #DOND7, which were displayed on screens by the stage. Jelani Maynard, a brother of LAU, hosted the show and kept energy up throughout the night.

“We were all putting in ideas to make the event the best it can be,” said Lamar Leonard, the assistant treasurer and USGA rep for LAU. “My role tonight was to make sure people get signed in and get people to buy tickets for a good cause.”

Brayan Reevus and Mike Brea of LAU coordinated the event, working with all the technology and people to have everything go smoothly.

“I know most of the brothers; I always come out and enjoy the show,” said Tatiana Branch, who was at the event with the Communication Club. “I’m buying some extra raffle tickets because it goes to a good cause and they’re a great group of guys. They aren’t just the letters on their chest, they really are about supporting the campus they support each other.”

Communication Club was helping out with the events by filming. Jeff Rogers, the sergeant at arms for the Comm Club, said that Deal or No Deal is “a great time with great prizes” and that he looked forward to contributing to the event.

“We’ve been working with LAU more and we are filming the event the winners and the dance competitions between rounds,” said Veronica Bitz, the Communication Club’s executive assistant.

Ashley Gomez, a student at UNH, said she heard “lots of good things about it last year and want to keep it going!” Meagan Anderson was excited and happy that LAU had really great prizes to give away.

Zachary Harper, a sophomore computer science major, began by picking bag number three. As an alum of the game from last year, he had a plan and chose to get rid of numbers one, four, six, eight, and 16 first and as the bags were opened, the prizes were revealed.

Prizes included a Nintendo Wii with a Mario game, headphones, UNH socks, an HP laptop, Bluetooth speakers, a UNH sports bundle, UNH blanket, leather wallet, UNH lanyard, a 48 inch TV, a PlayStation 4, a Sony camera, a UNH hoodie and a 16gb iPod.

At the end of removing all the other prizes, Harper was given the chance to switch the bag in his hand for the last bag on stage, which he did and, by doing so, he won a UNH t-shirt.

Chad Potter picked bag number 12 and kept going through the entire game but, sadly, bag number 12 held not a PlayStation 4 but a free hug, which was taken with a smile. Janna Rosenthal, a kick boxing instructor, played quickly and won a Sony camera.

LAU’s host then started a dance competition between Harper and another LAU brother who knew how to rock out to the recent hit “About A Week Ago” but the fraternity member couldn’t compete with Harper when he started to make it rain raffle tickets, causing the audience to get up on their feet to catch some.

Some other winners of the night included Brandi Rodriguez, who won the PS4 and Devon Carter won the Bluetooth speakers. Terry Tozzi took $175 in giftcards, and Tatiana Boyd won the Wii and Mario game.

Sodexo is turning the tables

by Leah Myers | March 25, 2015

Sodexo faculty chefs from the local collegial dining services participated in a food competition, Battle of the Chefs, in which they prepared food with exotic ingredients.

A plate of escargot (Photos taken by Leah Myers/Charger Bulletin Photo)

A plate of escargot
(Photos taken by Leah Myers/Charger Bulletin Photo)

Chef representatives came from the University of New Haven, Bridgeport, Fairfield, Nichols, and Assumption dining services to compete on March 11 during most of dinner hours, which range from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

The chefs were mixed into three teams. One team was given blood sausage, in which they decided to embed it into an eggroll. Another used frog legs, frying them and adding dipping sauces. The third team had escargot. The mystery ingredient, which was potatoes, was required to somehow be included in the meal.

The students were encouraged to try all of the foods and vote on their favorite. The first place dish belonged to the sausage eggrolls.

Marissa Bucchieri, a UNH campus executive chef, helped run the event and gave students information on the presented food. She said that it is fun to try new things, especially when it comes to food.

Other than feeling uneasy about eating slimy creatures, the students have enjoyed the concept of trying new things and overseeing the whole event during dinner. Out of the three meals a day, students tend to make the most effort to eat dinner at a dining hall with friends, ensuring that holding such events during that time would be successful.

“Dinner is busy; 6:30 p.m. is peak time,” Bucchieri said.

The Sodexo Company runs the battle across their school locations to add fun and interaction for the students they serve.

This was the first time in a while that UNH has hosted the Battle of the Chefs; next year, it will rotate to another local school, which is required of Sodexo.

P.I.R.O welcomes local paranormal author

by Francesca Fontanez | March 25, 2015

A Bridgeport newspaper published a story about paranormal activity on Lindley Street, causing a national interest in supernatural occurrences in November 1974. Now, more than 40 years later, the story was brought to the UNH Campus.

On Monday, March 9, Paranormal Investigation Research Organization sponsored William Hall, a Bridgeport native and author. Hall visited the University of New Haven to discuss the events recounted in his book, The World’s Most Haunted House: The True Story of The Bridgeport Poltergeist on Lindley Street.

P.I.R.O. members and students gathered in Moulton Lounge as Hall shared with the audience that he was initially skeptical of any supernatural activity. It wasn’t until he went back and reviewed past articles, audio interviews and city records that his mind was changed.

Once he was convinced that the activity was real, he decided to take the matter into his own hands. Through intense research, Hall was able to use the information he gathered in order to share the story of the Haunting of Lindley Street with audiences around the nation by publishing his book in August 2014. His intention is to dismiss any myths, and add facts to a ghost story he now believes, along with hundreds of others to be true.

“There were over 100 witnesses,” Hall said in regards to the paranormal activity back in 1979, which is what made this specific haunting stand apart from others. “This is one of the most witnessed hauntings in history.”

Although the happenings of Lindley Street are still highly debated, Hall’s book outlines many undisputed facts and events surrounding the circumstances of the 1974 phenomenon.

The School for Wives

by The Charger Bulletin | March 25, 2015

By STEPHEN SHEPERD
STAFF WRITER
SSHEP2@.unh.newhaven.edu

Written and first performed in 1662, Molière’s first great verse play follows Arnolphe’s ill-fated attempts to cultivate the perfectly subservient wife. His scheme to wed his young ward and rule the roost is threatened by nothing less than true love. This drag production is a contemporary take on the questions Molière raised in the seventeenth century about gender, power, romance, and relationships.

“The School for Wives”
By Jean Baptiste Poquelin de Molière
Directed by Jessica Silsby Brater
Dramaturgy by Meg Savilonis
Presented by the University of New Haven Theater Program
March 26 through 29, 2015
Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday at 3 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for students, $10 for faculty, staff, etc. with a UNH ID, and $15 for the general public.

Hope to see you there! It’s the new, old kind of rom-com!
————-
Also feel free to look up more info on the play itself and go to the Facebook event page:https://www.facebook.com/events/830680016967410/
Advance tickets on sale until Wednesday, March 25, 2015 @ 11:59 AM at www.newhaven.edu/theatertickets(no box office tickets until performance dates).

No cash, more gum: Jay Krugman shares his story of success with the UNH campus

by Emma O'Dell | March 25, 2015

Music producer Jay Krugman steps onto the campus of University of New Haven to tell the music industry students the story of his life Monday, March 9.

Jay Krugman is the brother of Murray Krugman, a music professor at the University of New Haven. Maury teaches Production, Promotion and Distribution, and invited his brother to talk to the students. Following a lecture, Krugman held a question and answer session.

Everyone on campus was welcome, but the event was mainly for the music students to attend and learn how to further their careers. Krugman also helped to provide an incite into the world of music that he has been involved in for years.

Before Jay Krugman talked, his brother introduced him by telling a story about their childhood. Their father had given them bubble gum; Murray ate all of his within that day, but Jay had sold his to the kid down the street. That night, they got a knock on the door and their father answered it. Coming back to get Jay from the dinner table, their father told Jay he must give back the money. Jay, being five at the time, said “no cash, more gum,” and from then on, Murray knew his brother would do great things.

Jay Krugman started out at Harper College in Illinois as anthropology major. It wasn’t until Woodstock of 1969 when he was sitting on the field looking around at the thousands of people that had bought tickets that realized there was a lot of money in the music business.

At first, he was a cab driver for three months after college; from there he worked in the tape library organizing music for $3 an hour and went on interviews for three years. After that, he went into production at Record Planet in New York as a recording engineer for eight years. Following that, he went on to become the product manger at Columbia Records, where he was head of marketing from 1989 to 1996.

“The day after the first day, it’s all on you,” Krugman stated.

In 2004, he left BMI in California and moved back to New York. Krugman decided to become an independent marketing consultant. Because he an independent marketing agent, he told the students that they must know three things: “What’s the product? Who’s the audience? And how do you reach them?”

During the talk, he had the students engage in conversation and ask any questions they wanted because he has worked with such big names like Tony Bennett, New Kids on the Block, and Rolling Stones. His back and forth banter with his brother made the students laugh with them and feel more open.

One question asked by a student was what he thought was the most challenging moment in his career. Krugman answered by saying “relationships are everything, to make a name for yourself and to make connections.” He then pointed to his brother, “[I] had this guy, who was a legendary rock producer at the time, and that helped.” This made the students nod with agreement and admiration.

When asked what would be the most important thing he would want these students to take away from his visit, Krugman responded with, “I hope some students in this room will hear what I have to say and it helps them find their musical path.”

“It was interesting to see what my professor’s brother had to say,” said Nicole Pierce, a music industry major.

“I hadn’t realized how successful he had been in the music industry before the presentation.”

Jay Krugman inspired and opened the eyes of many prospective students.

No cash, more gum: Jay Krugman shares his story of success with the UNH campus

by The Charger Bulletin | March 23, 2015

By Emma O’Dell
eodel1@unh.newhaven.edu

 “The music business has never been more vital, and the record business more dead.” – Jay Krugman

Music producer Jay Krugman steps onto the campus of University of New Haven to tell the music industry students the story of his life Monday, March 9.

Jay Krugman is the brother of Murray Krugman, a music professor at the University of New Haven. Maury teaches Production, Promotion and Distribution, and invited his brother to talk to the students. Following a lecture, Krugman held a question and answer session.

Everyone on campus was welcome, but the event was mainly for the music students to attend and learn how to further their careers. Krugman also helped to provide an insight into the world of music that he has been involved in for years.

Before Jay Krugman talked, his brother introduced him by telling a story about their childhood. Their father had given them bubble gum; Murray ate all of his within that day, but Jay had sold his to the kid down the street. That night, they got a knock on the door and their father answered it. Coming back to get Jay from the dinner table, their father told Jay he must give back the money. Jay, being five at the time, said “no cash, more gum,” and from then on, Murray knew his brother would do great things.

Jay Krugman started out at Harper College in Illinois as anthropology major. It wasn’t until Woodstock of 1969 when he was sitting on the field looking around at the thousands of people that had bought tickets that realized there was a lot of money in the music business.

At first, he was a cab driver for three months after college; from there he worked in the tape library organizing music for $3 an hour and went on interviews for three years. After that, he went into production at Record Planet in New York as a recording engineer for eight years. Following that, he went on to become the product manager at Columbia Records, where he was head of marketing from 1989 to 1996.

“The day after the first day, it’s all on you,” Krugman stated.

In 2004, he left BMI in California and moved back to New York. Krugman decided to become an independent marketing consultant. Because he an independent marketing agent, he told the students that they must know three things: “What’s the product? Who’s the audience? And how do you reach them?”

During the talk, he had the students engage in conversation and ask any questions they wanted because he has worked with such big names like Tony Bennett, New Kids on the Block, and Rolling Stones. His back and forth banter with his brother made the students laugh with them and feel more open.

One question asked by a student was what he thought was the most challenging moment in his career. Krugman answered by saying “relationships are everything, to make a name for yourself and to make connections.” He then pointed to his brother, “[I] had this guy, who was a legendary rock producer at the time, and that helped.” This made the students nod with agreement and admiration.

When asked what would be the most important thing he would want these students to take away from his visit, Krugman responded with, “I hope some students in this room will hear what I have to say and it helps them find their musical path.”

“It was interesting to see what my professor’s brother had to say,” said Nicole Pierce, a music industry major. “I hadn’t realized how successful he had been in the music industry before the presentation.”

Jay Krugman inspired and opened the eyes of many prospective students.

Yvette Noel-Schure shares insight to the music industry with UNH students

by The Charger Bulletin | March 21, 2015

BY Elissa Sanci & Samantha Mathewson

Yvette Noel-Schure, a former senior Vice President of Media at Columbia Records/Sony Music and founder of Schure Media Group, spoke at the University of New Haven Wed. March 11 at the German Club.

Yvette Noel-Schure (Photo provided by Noel-Schure)

Yvette Noel-Schure (Photo provided by Noel-Schure)

Schure was the first of the Music Department’s Master Speaker Lecture Series for the 2015 spring semester.  Schure worked for Columbia Records for 17 years as a publicist, representing artists including Beyoncé, Mariah Carey, Adelle and John Legend.

Schure has a love both for words and music; this is what led her to Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1975, from her home in Grenada, an island in the Caribbean. Schure first worked for Gannett Westchester Newspapers as a crime beat reporter.

However, she disliked the grisly nature of crime coverage, which led her to take a job as a music reporter for Black Beat magazine, where spent eight years interviewing various artists.

“It wasn’t about the money,” Schure said after explaining that the paycheck she received with Black Beat was far less than she expected. “It was about the music. The atmosphere was intoxicating.

After eight years, Schure left for Columbia Records/Sony Music, where she started as a “very wet-behind-the-ears” publicist, as she said. Schure represented many different artists, including Mariah Carey, Destiny’s Child, and eventually Beyoncé, when she went broke away from Destiny’s Child to pursue a solo career.

A publicist is the go between between a product (in Schure’s case, the product being a band or artist) and the media. However, Schure defines a publicist as a person with patience, persistence and passion. “Nothing happens in one phone call,” she said. “And passion isn’t something you put on a resume; it’s something you need to show.”

“You will cut your own path, but you must listen to your own heart,” Schure told the students at UNH. “[Do what’s] best for you, what you’re good at.”

She explained that when you are happy doing something you love, it is then that the money will come.

“If you do the hard work and everything it takes, it will come,” said Schure. “If you’re not passionate about something, you would be a very unhappy individual, believe that. If you are happy, you’re doing ok.”

“I wake up feeling like I am living a purposeful life,” said Schure, who explained that while she can’t cash that at a bank, it matters much more. “Everything you dream and work hard for, you can achieve.”

Schure said that she is happiest when she is in front of students. It is then that she is able to share her experiences and knowledge. “Publicity has opened up a road that has led me to many young people,” she said.

“It was interesting to hear how successful Yvette has been, especially since she wasn’t even from the U.S.,” said Nicole Pierce, a music industry major. “It shows that hard work does pay off.”

When asked why she presented at UNH, she said she not only wanted to speak to students, but that she wanted to learn from them as well. She said she wanted to know how they view the world and how they view adults. She was excited to have an open dialogue with “incredible students.”

Meet this year’s USGA candidates

by Miriam Correia | March 19, 2015

Monday, March 9, the candidates for the USGA elections were formally introduced in the Bartels Programming Space.  Current USGA President, Richard Rotella, hosted and brought a lighthearted attitude to the event.

Rotella opened the event and introduced every candidate: three for Presidential, one for Treasurer and 26 for the 23 Senatorial Positions.  Each candidate that was present was given the opportunity to stand up to put a face to the name.

After everyone was introduced, Rotella opened up the floor for questions and for any of the candidates to say a little bit about themselves if they wanted to.  Most of the candidates said something and asked each other and answered questions.  It was an informal way to get to know who the candidates are; some are repeaters and some are new, but they gave reasons why some people want to continue on in USGA against the reasons that the new people want to be involved.

There are 26 candidates for the 23 Senate positions, so as Rotella said, “It will be a real competition this year.”

The candidates for Senate are: Benjamin Atwater, Kellie Bundschuh, Thomas Coby, Mathew Chrusz, Daniel Chudy, Joseph Delayo, Nicholas Demko, Kelly Dowd, Steven Gillette, John Houllahan, Benjamin Laplante, Seamus Mahon, David Marucheau, Samantha Moul, Nicholas Mroczka, Timothy Muyano, Virginia Paino, Stephanie Palermo, Christopher Sang, Melina Singer, Rachel Spotts, Michael Swift, Mark Sylvester, Jerome Ware, Daniel Waterman, and Nathan Zuba.

Annalisa Berardinelli, who is currently Assistant Treasurer under John Foti, is running unopposed for USGA Treasurer, but she does need 51 percent of the votes to win so the position will not be handed to her.

James Kielar, Kayla Wallace, and Colin Weber are all running for USGA President.

The group of candidates all seemed to be familiar with each other, for the most part; whether they are in USGA together or are in various sororities and fraternities, they seemed to make it more comfortable for each other by just being themselves and joking with each other but also asking each other thought-provoking questions.

One question that was posed for all candidates to answer was whether Greek Life has a positive or negative effect on USGA since so many of the leaders are parts of Greek Life.  A few people were able to answer this question as their turns came about but some of the answers that stuck out were that Greek Life has a positive effect on USGA because the Senators bring the voice of the campus as a whole so they need to be unbiased and separate the needs of their organization from the needs of the campus.  Another person said it made her proud to have so many members of Greek Life as part of USGA because it shows that leaders do come out of Greek organizations.

The night was a success and the more visibility the candidates have the more information the campus will have to make informed decisions.  Make sure to go to all the election events!

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